ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA: – IUPPITER STATOR IN PALATINO RITROVATO (1988-2013)? in: LA REPUBBLICA (28/02/2013); (11/06/1988), p.21 & IL MESSAGGERO (28/02/2013); (05/06/2000), p. 20.

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Un ringraziamento speciale a Gianni De Dominicis, Roma (28 Febbraio 2013): “Ciao Martin, ecco l’articolo de “Il Messaggero” del 28 Febbraio  sul ritrovamento del tempio di giove statore. Saluti, Gianni,” Roma (28/02/2013).

PDF = ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA: “Ecco il tempio di Giove Statore” IL MESSAGERO (28/02/2013).

 

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Samuel Ball Platner (as completed and revised by Thomas Ashby): A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, London: Oxford University Press, 1929, p. 304:
Iuppiter Stator, aedes (templum, ἱερόν): a temple vowed, according to tradition (BC 1917, 79‑84), by Romulus at the critical moment in the battle between the Romans and the Sabines when the former had been driven across the forum valley to the porta Mugonia (Liv. I.12.3‑6; ps. Cic. orat. pr. quam in exilium iret 24; Ov. Fast. VI.794; Dionys. II.50; Flor. I.1.13; de vir. ill. 2.8). The epithet stator appears in Greek as ὀρθώσιος (Dionys.) and στήσιος (App. Plut.) This temple was never built, but in 294 B.C. the consul, M. Atilius Regulus, made a similar vow under similar circumstances in a battle with the Samnites, and erected the temple immediately afterwards (Liv. X.36.11, 37.15). Livy explains that no actual building had been put up by Romulus, but fanum tantum, id est locus templo effatus — an attempt to reconcile fact with what had evidently become the popular tradition (Cic. Cat. I.33; ps. Cic. loc. cit.). Its site is variously indicated — in Palatii radice, ps. Cic.; ante Palatini ora iugi, Ov.; ad veterem portam Palatii, Liv.; παρὰ ταῖς καλουμέναις Μουγωνίσι πύλαις, Dionys.; ἐν ἀρχῇ τῆς ἰερᾶς ὁδοῦ πρὸς τὸ Παλάτιον ἀνιόντων, Plut. Cic. 16; cf. Ov. Trist. III.1.32; Liv. I.41.4; Plin. NH XXXIV.29; App. B. C. II.11), and Not. places it in Region IV. It is represented on the relief of the Haterii (Mon. d. Inst. V.7) as hexastyle, of the Corinthian order, and facing the clivus Palatinus.

Cicero called the senate together in this temple (Cic. Cat. II.12; ps. Cic. loc. cit.; Plut. Cic. 16), which was probably not unusual; and in p304it was kept what was evidently a bit of liturgy composed by Livius Andronicus (Liv. XXVII.37.7). The day of dedication is given by Ovid (Fast. VI.793) as 27th January, but this may perhaps be that of a later restoration, and not of Regulus’ temple (WR 122‑123). In fact, we learn from Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 111, that either this temple or that in the porticus Metelli was dedicated on 5th September; and, as Hemer. Urb. (cited below) associates that temple with that of Juno Regina, the reference in Fast. Ant. may be taken to be to the temple now under discussion. Two inscriptions of the later empire (CIL VI.434, 435) probably belong to this temple, and it is mentioned in the fourth century (Not.).

Just east of the arch of Titus, a site corresponding with the literary references, are ruins consisting of a large rectangular platform of concrete, on which are some enormous blocks of peperino and travertine (Hermes, 1885, 412). On this foundation the mediaeval turris Cartularia was built (for the explanation of this name, see Rend. dei Lincei 1912, 767‑772; AJA 1913, 569),1 which was not torn down until 1829. This foundation has generally been identified as that of the temple of Iuppiter Stator of the Flavian period (LR 200; HC 250‑252; CR 1905, 75; BC 1903, 18; 1914, 93; 1917, 79‑84; TF 89; DR 178‑182; RE Suppl. IV.480, 481). Some tufa walls, recently excavated close to the north-east side of the arch and beneath its foundations, may have belonged to the temple at an earlier date when its position was slightly different (YW 1908, 23; CR 1909, 61), but the supposition is very doubtful. Others have sought it on the area Palatina, but wrongly (HJ 22).

Fonte / source: “Iuppiter Stator, aedes” (1929, p. 304), in: Samuel Ball Platner (as completed and revised by Thomas Ashby): A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, London: Oxford University Press, 1929, p. 304;

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/Europe/Italy/Lazio/Roma/Rome/_Texts/PLATOP*/Aedes_Jovis_Statoris.html

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– IUPPITER STATOR IN PALATIO RITROVATO? Roma antica, Paolo Carafa, Andrea Carandini e Nikolaos Arvanitis, Rivista: N. 158-2013 mese: Marzo-Aprile (2013).

Le nuove indagini archeologiche iniziate sul Palatino hanno prodotto una quasi certezza che ancora una volta costringe a rivedere la carta topografica di Roma antica Il luogo del primo culto di Giove Statore si trovava sul Palatino in un contesto di monumenti ed edifici significativi per la più antica storia dell’Urbe…

www.archeologiaviva.it/index.php/article/1927/IUPPITER-ST…

– Ritrovato il tempio di Giove Statore era il dio che dava forza ai Romani. Dagli scavi sul Palatino riemerge il primo santuario della divinità che veniva invocata per dare agli eserciti di Roma la forza di resistere di fronte agli attacchi dei nemici. LA REPUBBLICA (28/02/2013).

roma.repubblica.it/cronaca/2013/02/28/news/ritrovato_il_t…

– ROME- Temple of ‘Jupiter the Stayer’ found. Romulus started cult to god who made Romans unstoppable, (28/02/2013).

www.gazzettadelsud.it/news/english/36543/Temple-of–Jupit…

– Scoperto il Tempio di Giove Statore sul Palatino, IL TEMPO (27/02/2013).

È stato scoperto a Roma il primo tempio di Giove Statore, che nel culto degli antichi era l’epiteto con cui la divinità era invocata per dare agli eserciti la forza di resistere. Si tratterebbe dei resti del leggendario tempio che venne fondato, secondo la tradizione, da Romolo dopo la battaglia, nell’area del foro, contro i Sabini attorno al 750 a.C., dopo il famoso ratto delle sabine.

www.iltempo.it/cultura-spettacoli/2013/02/27/scoperto-il-…

– ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA: “Ecco il tempio di Giove Statore” IL MESSAGERO (28/02/2013).

Parte 1 =

http://www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/8515522779/in/photostream/

Parte 2 =

http://www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/8516636702/in/photostream

– ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA: “Andrea Carandini – Che relegge miti, saghe e reoerti dopo le sue scorperte archeologiche al Palatino,” IL MESSAGGERO (05/06/2000), p. 20.

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/422227963/in/…

– ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA: IL NEW YORK TIMES “Fu Romolo a fondare Roma quel mito e` ormai realita,” LA REPUBBLICA (11/06/1988), p. 21.

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/430704388/in/…

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s.v.,

— ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA: Prof. Giacomo Boni & Il Foro Romano (1899-1923), Dott.ssa Patrizia Fortini ed Edoardo Santini, SSBAR ARCHIVI & indissoluble.com (12/2012).

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/8423176920/in…

— ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA: Foto 1-2: Scavi, IL FORO ROMANO, VIA SACRA | IUPPITER STATOR IN PALATINO RITROVATO (10/2012).

ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA: Il Foro Romano, nuovi scavi lungo la Via Sacra [Prof. Andrea Carandini, La Sapienza – Universita’ di Roma (10/2012)].

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/8315016442/in…

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/8314394386/in…

— [Raccolte =] Rome – Prof. Andrea Carandini: ‘Le Origini di Roma’, The Palatine Hill (1988-90), the Roman Forum, the Sacra Via & the House of Vestals (2001-13).

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/sets/72157600…

– ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA – PALATINO NORD-ORIENTALE: Prof. Clementina Panella, La Sapienza – Universita` di Roma (2013):

— La periodizzazione, Undici sono i periodi individuati nello scavo: Dal IX al VII secolo a.C – età medioevale e moderna.

digilab2.let.uniroma1.it/palatino/it/content/la-periodizz…

— Dalle origini all’eta orientalizzante.

archeopalatino.uniroma1.it/it/content/dalle-origini-allet…

— Età arcaica e protorepubblicana VI – V secolo a.C.

archeopalatino.uniroma1.it/it/content/et%c3%a0-arcaica-e-…

– Antica Roma – La suggestiva teoria di Piero Meogrossi della Sovrintendenza Un asse orienta i monumenti, come i pianeti dei 21 aprile 753. Corriere della Sera (04/02/2011), pg. 16.

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/5496545103/

— [Raccolte =] Roma – Palatino, Il tempio ritrovato – intitolato a Juppiter Invictus. La Repubblica (05/11/2010), p. 1.

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/sets/72157625…